Gallery One

Gallery One – is the space where you can explore the museum collections and the stories they reveal of Wrexham’s past.

Enter the gallery via the Time Tunnel where you can see objects chosen and interpreted by members of the local community.

The gallery has been specially designed to appeal to the many different people the museum attracts. What will appeal to you?

Meet Brymbo Man, listen to the news of his discovery and find out how science has revealed his secrets.

See the Bronze Age Rossett Hoard and watch two specially produced films that explain how the hoard was made nearly three thousand years ago.

Try your hand at rebuilding Holt castle or listen to historic characters report from the frontline of Wrexham’s past: the conquest of Wales, the time of Owain Glyn Dŵr and the Civil War.

Sit back and relax in the Hippodrome as you watch films about Wrexham Lager, Wrexham FC and Wrexham’s mining past

Sniff out the charms of Victorian Wrexham with the help of the Acton Dog…


The Rossett Lead Pig

On September 21, Wrexham Museum, for the first time, put on public display the Roman lead ingot or ‘pig’ that was discovered near Rossett, north of Wrexham, last year.

The pig was discovered by local detectorist Rob Jones who immediately notified the local Finds Officer (NE Wales) for the Portable Antiquities Scheme in Wales (PAS Cymru) based at Wrexham Museum, allowing the object to be examined whilst it was still in the ground.

The pig has a fine moulded inscription which bears the name of Marcus Trebellius Maximus, the governor of the province of Britannia between 63 and 69CE, during the reign of the Emperor Nero. No other inscriptions bearing his name have ever been found in the UK, which is why it has attracted so much excitement nationally.

The extraction of lead and silver was a significant reason for the invasion of Britain under the Emperor Claudius in 43CE. We know that the Romans exploited the mineral resources of Flintshire and possibly Minera, but we don’t have clear evidence at the latter site.

It is not currently known where the lead in the Rossett pig came from although work to determine this is currently ongoing at the University of Liverpool. We await the results of their research.

The Rossett lead pig is on show in Gallery 1


Rossett Roman Villa

Archaeologists from Wrexham Museum, the University of Chester and Archaeological Survey West have discovered a Roman villa near Rossett, Wrexham. The villa is the first of its kind ever to be discovered in north east Wales and represents an exciting addition to our knowledge of the area during the Roman period.

The site was discovered through the cooperation of local metal detectorists who discovered Roman material at the site, this sparked a remote sensing survey which revealed clear evidence of a buried structure. The remains appear to be of a fairly typical form with a number of stone and tile buildings surrounding a central courtyard, the survey also suggested its association with a field system, a trackway and other related buildings and structures. Fieldwalking at the site has yielded artefacts from the late 1st century to the early 4th century AD, suggesting that the villa was occupied for the majority of Roman rule in Britain.

The Roman army invaded Britain in AD 43 and quickly pushed northwards and westwards across the country. The fortress at Chester was established around AD 74 and with relative peace came the establishment of a network of towns and rural settlements. Most villas were essentially farming establishments, ranging from relatively simple in design to very grand with mosaic floors, bath houses and underfloor heating systems. The discovery of architectural fragments found during fieldwalking suggest that this villa may incorporate at least some of these grander features.

Dr Caroline Pudney, Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Chester said: “This exciting discovery potentially alters our understanding of north east Wales in the wake of the Roman conquest. Previous interpretations suggest that most people in this area either lived in settlements associated with Roman military sites or in quite simple farmsteads that continued to utilise Iron Age roundhouse architectural forms. The identification of the villa now questions this narrative.”

The Museum and the University are now planning a programme of work to further investigate the site over the next few years subject to funding and appropriate permissions. The work on the project to date has been funded by the Roman Research Trust and supported by Wrexham Museum and the University of Chester.

Brymbo Man

In August 1958 local workmen including Ron Pritchard were digging a pipe trench near No.79 Cheshire View, Brymbo, near Wrexham, when they found more than they expected: a large capstone about 1ft/30cm below the surface. They had found Brymbo Man.

When archaeologists from the National Museum of Wales arrived to investigate, they excavated a stone lined box or cist beneath the capstone. Inside the cist were the incomplete remains of a skeleton, a small earthenware pot and a flint knife.

His grave and the pot, known to archaeologists as a Beaker, date Brymbo Man to the early Bronze Age, probably about 1600BC.

Brymbo Man is on show in Gallery 1

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